Copy of Jeremy’s post-hearing comments:

Once again I have proven that no one should pay any attention to anything I say about what is likely to happen in court.

To make a short story even shorter, Jerry asked the court to grant a delay so that we would have time to find out whether or not the next appeals court takes my appeal. This is the appeal we’ve already filed but which isn’t mandatory, because what I’m appealing is only the conviction on a violation, and I’m not a more respectable criminal who’s done something worse.

To my surprise, assistant DA Tunney didn’t really have any objection, saying he didn’t want to be in the position of sentencing a defendant before his conviction was final (or words to that effect) and, equally to my surprise, Judge Berry went along with it, granting me another 90 days in which to await the appeals court’s decision.

The guiding principle here is that we’re still fighting, still insisting that I was had a right to do what I did. But I use the term “guiding” loosely, because if anything’s guiding me, how come I feel like I’ve been spun around three times with a donkey’s tail in my hand?

Chesapeake Energy – former big player in Finger Lakes’ leasing

ProPublica: At the end of 2011, Chesapeake Energy, one of the nation’s biggest oil and gas companies, was teetering on the brink of failure.

Its legendary chief executive officer, Aubrey McClendon, was being pilloried for questionable deals, its stock price was getting hammered and the company needed to raise billions of dollars quickly.

The money could be borrowed, but only on onerous terms. Chesapeake, which had burned money on a lavish steel-and-glass office complex in Oklahoma City even while the selling price for its gas plummeted, already had too much debt.

In the months that followed, Chesapeake executed an adroit escape, Continue reading

Marcellus Watch: Trust, but verify imported drilling waste

State and local officials are well on their way to burying radioactivity as an issue in the debate over whether to allow a major expansion of the Chemung County Landfill on the Chemung River about six miles southeast of Elmira.

The landfill, which has been leased to Casella Waste Systems Inc. since 2005, has been accepting drilling wastes from Pennsylvania since 2009 — often turning away its own municipal waste to save room for the more lucrative imports.

Now the county legislature is considering a plan to increase the landfill’s capacity from 180,000 tons of waste a year to 417,000 tons. The landfill that currently occupies 54 acres of a 327-acre site would add 50 acres of new lined landfill cells.

Chemung County Executive Tom Santulli, a supporter of the expansion, has taken the lead role in denying that radioactivity matters. Continue reading

SENECA IN THE BALANCE

Seneca in the BalanceTuesday, March 11, 2014, 7:00 – ­9:00 pm (doors open at 6:00 pm)

Watkins Glen High School Auditorium, 301 12th St, Watkins Glen, NY 14891

Live stream at  www.Seneca-In-The-Balance.com

Find out how close we are to becoming the gas storage and transportation hub for the Northeast; ​ ​
Discover what we’ve learned about the structural integrity of the salt caverns under Seneca Lake ​ that are slated for storage expansion, and how this could impact the region;
Learn about this expansion plan’s regional economic and public health impacts;
Identify what our region’s legislative bodies think about this project;
Understand the legal standing of the community and possible legal recourse.

FEATURED SPEAKERS include:
Richard A. Young, Ph.D: Distinguished Service Professor (Emeritus), Department of Geological ​ ​Sciences, SUNY at Geneseo
John Halfman, Ph.D: Research Scientist, water quality expert, Finger Lakes Institute, Hobart​ ​William Smith College
Moneen Nasmith: Associate Attorney, Earthjustice, NE Office
Steve Churchill, Seneca County Board of Supervisors
Paula Fitzsimmons, Schuyler County Physician Assistant
Doug Hazlitt, Co­Owner of Hazlitt 1852 Vineyards
Yvonne Taylor & Joseph Campbell, Gas Free Seneca

Schumer:…not enough to protect many communities along the rail lines…many places in upstate NY…

…..These steps are not enough to protect many communities along the rail lines, Senator Charles E. Schumer, Democrat of New York, said this week. This includes many places in upstate New York, like Buffalo, Rochester, Utica, Syracuse and Albany, that have seen higher rail traffic. He compared the industry’s use of outdated tank cars to “a ticking time bomb” and urged federal regulators to quickly retire these older cars, known as DOT-111s, in favor of models built after 2011 that have better protections.

More at NY Times